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Date/Time
Date(s) - 04/20/2021
10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Location
Cumming Arts Center @ the Brannon-Heard House

Categories


Registration and payment form is located on the Classes page. THIS IS AN ONLINE ZOOM CLASS  Login details will be forwarded to you

 

“Painting: Oil or Acrylic”

Instructor:  Elizabeth Stallings  ZOOM CLASSES

Spring 2021
Level: All Levels (students must have a working knowledge of their paints and materials)
Improve your painting skills and connect with other painters in an exciting and informative Zoom Painting class!  Your experienced instructor, a professional painter and teacher, guides each Zoom meeting, always including a lesson for the week and individual critique of students’ work. Each week students receive a reminder email to submit their images for critique along with links to “youtube” videos relevant to the lesson of the week.  The Zoom format allows for interaction among the students and with the instructor, contributing to an exciting atmosphere of artistic growth.
Instruction covers all things painting: the fundamentals of good painting, how to use the elements and principals of painting to create better paintings, tips, techniques and tricks, and in depth coverage of color theory and design.  Each lesson is followed up with an emailed handout for the student that may also contain homework exercises for those who wish to explore the day’s lesson in more depth.
This class requires that students be experienced in how to use their painting materials to begin a painting.  Students submit emailed jpeg images of their painting and reference photo to the instructor prior to the Zoom meeting, in order to receive critique.  All students are encouraged to work at their own pace, experiment and to find their personal voice and expression in their work, whether through realism or abstraction.  Students are challenged to develop a body of work and increase the professional appearance of their paintings.
Register today to paint, learn new techniques, meet other artists and move forward with confidence in your painting skills.
The length of the online class time is contingent on the number of students.
All Students:  Your first email of images for your painting and reference will be due several days each week before the Zoom Class Session.  Handouts are emailed to students after the Zoom Class meeting. 
 

 

Students:  If you already paint, please download or request either the oil or acrylic painting supply list, and come to class ready to paint with a reference and canvas.

 Beginning Painters:  Please download or request the Oil or Acrylic Supply List, and bring supplies to the first class, along with an idea or photo of what you would like to paint.  If the supply list is confusing, please come to the first class with only a sketchpad and pencil and the instructor will advise you about supplies.

 ZOOM Class dates: April 20, 27, May 4,11,18 and 25

 Class times: 10:30AM – 12:30PM

 Class Fee: $180.00 (includes all six classes)

Minimum Number Of Students: 6

CLASS ONLINE REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT FORM→→→

ZOOM LOGIN DETAILS WILL BE SENT TO YOU AFTER REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT CONFIRMATION

OIL PAINTING SUPPLY LIST
Contact Instructor with Supply Questions at stallingsart@att.net
*If you already have supplies, please bring what you have to class*
*if you are new to painting and confused about supplies, please bring only a sketch pad
and pencil to the first class; the instructor will explain the supplies necessary for painting*
Note: Instructor recommends standard artists’ Oil Paints. If Water-Mixable Oil is used in
class, use products, such as medium, specifically for Water-Mixable oil.
Table Cover (plastic, only large enough for your painting area) Tape (Dollar$ Store masking or painters tape)
Paper towels or soft rags (lint free, Bounty is good)
Ruler, Pencil, Pen, Eraser, small sketch pad (max. 11”x14”) (or some copy paper)
Pliers (for stubborn paint tubes)
Smock or cover-up for clothes (optional)
Gloves: (optional) non-latex, close-fit
Plastic bags: for carrying towels and dirty brushes home (brushes are not cleaned in
the studio, and paper towels are not left in the trash bin, to cut down on oily rags and
odor)
Brush Cleaner Jar, Metal or glass: leak-proof lid, sold at supply stores. Jelly jars,
plastic containers etc. do not work. The metal locking lid cans intended for plein air
painters work very well for travel to and from class.
Small containers: leak-proof, for holding a little turpenoid, mediums or oil near your
palette. Clean face moisturizer jars with lids work well, or any small container.
A Reference for Painting: Students work from photos or from something small near
their easel. Students choose their subject. Ideally, the photo reference should be about
8”x10”, printed in black and white, and additionally in color. Beginners may not have a
clear idea about “what to paint”. Instructor will guide you in exercises and will have
some references available. Oil Paints: Oil painting sets or individual tubes (any brand), Beginners may start with a
limited amount of colors. Make sure that the paint is oil paint! Paint tubes are
sometimes not clearly marked. Experienced painters should bring what they have. The
following colors provide a versatile palette:
Titanium White Lemon Yellow Viridian
Ivory Black Cadmium Yellow Medium Yellow Ochre
Raw Umber Cadmium Orange Burnt Sienna
Cadmium Red Light Ultramarine Blue Dioxizine Violet
Cadmium Red Medium Cerulean Blue
Permanent Alizarin Crimson Sap Green
All of the colors are not necessary at first. Black, White, a red, a yellow, a blue,
and raw umber will get you started!
Palette Knife: Important! Plastic is ok, but not recommended, if buying a new one. This
knife is primarily for mixing paint and a metal palette knife with a crooked neck and a
smallish triangular blade with a pointed or slightly rounded tip (about a size 2 or 4) is
best.
Brushes: Experienced: bring the brushes you have.
Beginners: Limit brushes to three, unless you buy a set, until after the first class.
A small, medium, and larger size will get you started (about #’s 8,6,4). Long
(preferred) or short handled, bristle (coarse) or synthetic (softer, nylon) brushes
labeled for oil or acrylic painting. Both bristle and synthetics are used in painting.
In general, a “filbert” or “flat” will be suitable. Watercolor brushes are too soft for
oil paint. Inexpensive brush sets, with a wide variety of brushes, are
available at Hobby Lobby and Michaels.
Palette: Something to squeeze your paint out on, and to mix up colors on. A
palette should not be too small and cramped. The “Masters Palette”, a large
plastic box with a blue lid, is sold at supply stores. Recommended, and you can
carry left over paint home in it. Palette paper is sold to fit the palette, but is just
paper with one slick side. A less expensive alternative is freezer paper from the
grocery store. You can also use the freezer paper taped to a rigid board for a
palette. Do not buy palettes with “wells”, indented places for paint. These are
better for watercolor.
Canvas: Experienced painters: Your choice of surface and size for your
subject.
Beginning painters: canvas pad (min. size 9”x12”) or heavy paper for
practice, one canvas board (min. size 11”x 14”), and one stretched canvas
(min. size 11”x 14”). More may be required, depending on how much you paint.
Only the canvas pad will be used at the first class. You may decide on different
sized boards, or canvases, after first class
Foam core board (or any firm surface), only necessary for the canvas pad
paper; sized to fit your canvas from a pad.
Heavy Paper is fine for practicing with oil, but is not archival, and does not
replicate the feel of canvas.
Solvent: please use ODORLESS products in the studio. Gamsol, a product of
Gamblin, is the safest turpentine type product to use. Odorless Turpenoid (blue
can) is also recommended. Turpenoid Natural (green can) cannot be used for
thinning paint, and is not recommended. Hardware store turpentine is not
suitable for painting, will damage your brushes, and creates a smell that fellow
students may find allergic.
*Medium: Beginners: Liquin Original (a Winsor-Newton product, sold in a jar.
Beginners may wait to buy until after first class. Linseed oil or Walnut oil may
also be used to make the paint more fluid. Paint sets may include Linseed oil.
Experienced Painters: bring the medium you are used to working with.
*Mediums can be confusing. You may want to wait until after the first class
to purchase a medium, if you are a beginner.

*If you already have supplies, please bring what you have to class*

*If you are new to painting and confused about what to purchase, please come to the first class with a sketch pad and pencil, and the instructor will explain the supplies necessary for painting*

Table Cover (plastic, only large enough for your painting area)    

Tape (Dollar$ Store masking, or painters tape)

Paper towels or soft rags (lint free, Bounty is good)

Ruler, Pencil, Pen, Eraser, small sketch pad (max. 11”x 14”) (or some copy paper)  

Pliers (for stubborn paint tubes)

Smock or cover up for clothes (optional)

Spray bottle:  small, for water

Plastic containers:  2 large, for water

Acrylic Gloss Medium (liquid):  used to thin paint or to make paint flow smoothly. (do not buy “gel”)

Acrylic Retarder:  optional, slows drying time of paints

A Reference for Painting:  Students work from photos or from something small near their easel. Students choose their subject.  Ideally, the photo reference should be about 8”x10”, printed in black and white, and additionally in color.  Beginners may not have a clear idea about “what to paint”.  Instructor will guide you in exercises and will have some references available.   

Canvas:

 Experienced painters:  Your choice of surface and size for your subject.

 Beginning painters:  canvas pad (min. size 9”x12”) or heavy paper for practice, one canvas board (min. size 11”x 14”), and one stretched canvas (min. size 11”x 14”). More may be required, depending on how much you paint.  Only the canvas pad will be used at the first class. You may decide on different sized boards, or canvases, after first class

Foam core board (or any firm surface), only necessary for the canvas pad paper; sized to fit your canvas from a pad.

Paints:  starter set of Acrylic Paints, or paints may be purchased individually.  Starter sets usually have enough colors for beginning painting.  Please look at labeling carefully, as it’s so easy to pick up the wrong tube.  If buying individual tubes it’s essential to have black, white, red, yellow and blue.  These basic colors are recommended (if you have more that’s good too!):

Titanium white         Ivory Black         Raw or Burnt Umber(or both)        Sap Green

Ultramarine Blue  Cadmium Yellow Medium   Cadmium Red Medium  Cadmium Orange   Viridian (green)   Dioxizine Violet   Alizarin Crimson or Quinicridone Red

Cerulean Blue           Pthalo Blue         Cadmium Yellow Light

Some starter sets include everything you need to actually start painting, including a palette and brushes.

If you are going to buy more paints, you may want to wait until after the first class for recommendations.

Craft Acrylic paints are not intended for fine art painting. They will mix with artists’ acrylics, but have distinct drawbacks to painting, due to the quality of the paint.  In spite of that, if you want to try them, it will be ok.

Brushes:  Beginners: at least 3, small, medium and large, that are labeled for use with oil or acrylic (no watercolor brushes). Long handles recommended, short handles are ok especially if you will sit to paint, medium and large.  If you only have three brushes choose “Flats” to begin with.  The numbers on the brushes will vary by manufacturer, but generally a 4-6- 8 or 6-8-10 combination would work.  Brushes may be bristle fibers or the softer synthetic fibers (it’s good to have both).  Inexpensive brush sets at Hobby Lobby and Michaels are available in both bristle and synthetic.  They provide a lot of brushes, of different types, for the cost.

Experienced:  bring what you have.

Palette Knife:  Important!  Plastic is ok, but not recommended, if buying a new one. This knife is primarily for mixing paint and a metal palette knife with a crooked neck and a smallish triangular blade with a pointed or slightly rounded tip (about a size 2 or 4) is best.

Palette:  this is something to squeeze paint onto. The ‘Masters Covered Palette’( a plastic palette box with a lid)  lined with palette paper, or slick freezer wrap paper, works very well for transporting paint to and from class. A sponge that fits the box is sold separately, and it will help in keeping your paint from drying too quickly, but is not essential.  An alternative is any firm, flat something (like foam core or cardboard) covered with slick freezer wrap paper.  After use, the paper is thrown away and replaced. Do not buy palettes with “wells”, indented places for paint.  These are better for watercolor.

 

 

 

                                                 

Elizabeth Stallings

stallingsart@att.net                  www.elizabethstallingsart.com

Atlanta native Elizabeth Stallings pursued a dream and enrolled in painting classes at The Atlanta College of Art. A passion was born! Elizabeth now creates original art in a variety of two dimensional mediums: oil, acrylic, pastel, drawing materials, collage and watercolor. Her award winning paintings showcase her comprehensive training in both Classical Realism and Contemporary Abstraction. Elizabeth expresses her love of sharing art by teaching students of all ages; bringing over thirty years of teaching experience to the Cumming Art Center.

In her work, Elizabeth combines technical expertise with a sensitivity that captures the emotion of a subject. She is inspired by the inherent beauty of the natural world, and enjoys how the fluid nature of paint exploits that beauty.

“My paintings express my feelings about a particular time and place. I paint toward a connection with the viewer, attempting to share and showcase the unique mystery and beauty of my subject.”

Elizabeth has taught studio fine arts, and art history, for school programs in the public and private sector, including the Summer Institute for the Gifted at Emory University, and Brenau University’s BULLI program for seniors. She currently offers a variety of drawing and painting classes for adults at the Hudgens Center for Art and Learning in Duluth, Georgia. Her instruction allows room for individual expression, while providing students with a solid foundation in the core principles of creating works of art. Some of Elizabeth’s private students have attended the Georgia Governor’s Honors programs for fine arts and/or moved on to professional art careers. Elizabeth is often asked to speak, give demonstrations, and to jury art exhibits for art centers and professional organizations.  She exhibits on a regular basis in gallery, solo and juried shows.

              In 2020, the Covid pandemic created a shift to online instruction for Elizabeth’s classes.  She has successfully created a teaching module that continues to provide her students with quality art instruction and critique.  Online classes contribute to her students’ progress in their painting journey, while awaiting the reopening of in-person classes.

Instructor’s Refund and Cancellation Policy for Classes at the Cumming Art Center

For Spring 2021, the deadline to cancel a registration is  April 14, 2021.

For the Oil and Acrylic Painting Class, a minimum of six students is required for the class to “make”.  If registrations for the class are under six students five days prior to the beginning of classes (April 14, 2021), the class will be cancelled by the instructor.

If the instructor must cancel a class due to unforeseen circumstances, the class time will be rescheduled.

There are no refunds or pro-rations of fees offered by the instructor after the beginning of the class, or for classes missed by the student.

 “Painting: Oil or Acrylic”  ONLINE REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT FORM ↓

$ 0.00

 ACRYLIC PAINTING SUPPLY LIST

*If you already have supplies, please bring what you have to class*

*If you are new to painting and confused about what to purchase, please come to the first class with a sketch pad and pencil, and the instructor will explain the supplies necessary for painting*

Table Cover (plastic, only large enough for your painting area)    

Tape (Dollar$ Store masking, or painters tape)

Paper towels or soft rags (lint free, Bounty is good)

Ruler, Pencil, Pen, Eraser, small sketch pad (max. 11”x 14”) (or some copy paper)  

Pliers (for stubborn paint tubes)

Smock or cover up for clothes (optional)

Spray bottle:  small, for water

Plastic containers:  2 large, for water

Acrylic Gloss Medium (liquid):  used to thin paint or to make paint flow smoothly. (do not buy “gel”)

Acrylic Retarder:  optional, slows drying time of paints

A Reference for Painting:  Students work from photos or from something small near their easel. Students choose their subject.  Ideally, the photo reference should be about 8”x10”, printed in black and white, and additionally in color.  Beginners may not have a clear idea about “what to paint”.  Instructor will guide you in exercises and will have some references available.   

Canvas:

 Experienced painters:  Your choice of surface and size for your subject.

 Beginning painters:  canvas pad (min. size 9”x12”) or heavy paper for practice, one canvas board (min. size 11”x 14”), and one stretched canvas (min. size 11”x 14”). More may be required, depending on how much you paint.  Only the canvas pad will be used at the first class. You may decide on different sized boards, or canvases, after first class

Foam core board (or any firm surface), only necessary for the canvas pad paper; sized to fit your canvas from a pad.

Paints:  starter set of Acrylic Paints, or paints may be purchased individually.  Starter sets usually have enough colors for beginning painting.  Please look at labeling carefully, as it’s so easy to pick up the wrong tube.  If buying individual tubes it’s essential to have black, white, red, yellow and blue.  These basic colors are recommended (if you have more that’s good too!):

Titanium white         Ivory Black         Raw or Burnt Umber(or both)        Sap Green

Ultramarine Blue  Cadmium Yellow Medium   Cadmium Red Medium  Cadmium Orange   Viridian (green)   Dioxizine Violet   Alizarin Crimson or Quinicridone Red

Cerulean Blue           Pthalo Blue         Cadmium Yellow Light

 

Some starter sets include everything you need to actually start painting, including a palette and brushes.

 

If you are going to buy more paints, you may want to wait until after the first class for recommendations.

 

Craft Acrylic paints are not intended for fine art painting. They will mix with artists’ acrylics, but have distinct drawbacks to painting, due to the quality of the paint.  In spite of that, if you want to try them, it will be ok.

 

Brushes:  Beginners: at least 3, small, medium and large, that are labeled for use with oil or acrylic (no watercolor brushes). Long handles recommended, short handles are ok especially if you will sit to paint, medium and large.  If you only have three brushes choose “Flats” to begin with.  The numbers on the brushes will vary by manufacturer, but generally a 4-6- 8 or 6-8-10 combination would work.  Brushes may be bristle fibers or the softer synthetic fibers (it’s good to have both).  Inexpensive brush sets at Hobby Lobby and Michaels are available in both bristle and synthetic.  They provide a lot of brushes, of different types, for the cost.

Experienced:  bring what you have.

Palette Knife:  Important!  Plastic is ok, but not recommended, if buying a new one. This knife is primarily for mixing paint and a metal palette knife with a crooked neck and a smallish triangular blade with a pointed or slightly rounded tip (about a size 2 or 4) is best.

Palette:  this is something to squeeze paint onto. The ‘Masters Covered Palette’( a plastic palette box with a lid)  lined with palette paper, or slick freezer wrap paper, works very well for transporting paint to and from class. A sponge that fits the box is sold separately, and it will help in keeping your paint from drying too quickly, but is not essential.  An alternative is any firm, flat something (like foam core or cardboard) covered with slick freezer wrap paper.  After use, the paper is thrown away and replaced. Do not buy palettes with “wells”, indented places for paint.  These are better for watercolor.

Contact instructor with Supply Questions at stallingsart@att.net

 

 


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